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The SHARE Act and What It Means for Suppressors

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300 Blackout is so appealing to different shooters because it offers the unique ability to be suppressed, fired subsonic or supersonic, without modifying one’s weapon. That’s a big deal, but unfortunately, current gun laws make purchasing a suppressor erroneously difficult. Suppressors were placed under regulation of the National Firearms Act of 1934, making their sale and transfer expensive and time-consuming.

Buying a Suppressor isn’t Easy or Cheap

Currently, you must fill out plenty of extra paperwork in addition to a good ole’ background, you have to get your fingerprints taken and recorded, and you have to notify your local Sheriff and the ATF that you want to buy a suppressor. Once you notify those kind folks, you have to wait 6 months to a year in order to even get your hands on your suppressor of choice. Oh, and doing all that costs $200, in addition to the cost of your suppressor. That sucks.

The SHARE Act and the HPA

The SHARE Act, which includes the Hearing Protection Act, is hoping to change all that. We try to avoid political conjecture and conversations whenever we can, especially considering how polarizing the gun talk is in America, today. But we must clear up some information on the SHARE Act and Hearing Protection Act. The purpose of this piece is to do nothing more than inform you about the SHARE Act and what it intends to do:

What is The SHARE Act?

The SHARE Act, or officially known as H.R.3668, was sponsored by Rep. Jeff Duncan, a Republican in South Carolina. It was introduced to the House of Representatives on September 1st and intends to revise existing programs to expand access to hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting. This is an “omnibus bill”, meaning it contains plenty of smaller, singular bills addressing different legislation.

One of those bills is the Hearing Protection Act. The HPA specifically calls for treating “any silencer” the same as firearm. This means that firearm suppressors would no longer be regulated under the NFA. They would only be subject to the same background checks and legal requirements of owning a conventional rifle or handgun. Importantly, the HPA also prevents any anti-gun states from imposing exorbitant taxes on the sale, transfer, or use of a suppressor, proactively combating such states from trying to restrict their sale.

What the SHARE Act and HPA Don’t Do:

The SHARE Act and the included HPA do not deregulate the sale or use of suppressor. Those who wish to own such devices will still be required to pass the federally instituted background check through the NICS program. Prospective buyers will also be subject to the same ownership requirements as firearms.

That means failing the background check, or attempting to purchase a suppressor when knowingly ineligible to do so, will result in the same criminal offenses as when trying to purchase a firearm illegally. Lastly, suppressors will not be allowed to be sold via private sale without a transfer and background check.

 

Status of The SHARE Act

The SHARE Act and HPA are currently under threat because of the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas. Unfortunately, one particularly disliked former politician used this tragedy as a political stunt to speak out against the SHARE Act, even though it had nothing to do with the Vegas shooting and even though its deregulation of suppressors would have had no effect on, nor would it have prevented, the shooting from occurring.

You can support the SHARE Act and HPA by contacting your local state representatives. It’s an unfortunate truth that most politicians do not fully read or review legislation before voting on it. It’s also an unfortunate truth that politicians will vote on a piece of legislation in order to gain public favor, rather than vote based on the wishes of those who elected them.

You can contact your political representatives and urge them to support the SHARE Act by using the link provided here.

 


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